Easter Deviled Eggs

So I had some older eggs hanging out in my fridge and have taken a liking to making deviled eggs. Being that Easter was coming shortly, I decided to try making dyed deviled eggs. This was my adventure.

Start with the standard hard boiled eggs.
Start with the standard hard boiled eggs.

Hard boil eggs. I’ve been using large eggs and have found the following method to work quite well. Put the eggs into the pot with cool water. Turn the heat on High. When the water boils, turn off the stove, cover the eggs and let stand for 12 minutes.

Of course this time around, I got distracted and let the eggs boil for a couple minutes before getting the heat turned off. So I have a little bit of the green around the yolk :(.

Cracked the shell.
Cracked the shell.

I rolled the egg around on the counter, trying to get cracks all over the shell. Some turned out better than others.

Dyed the eggs with cracked shells.
Dyed the eggs with cracked shells.

I made egg dye using food coloring, water, and vinegar. The McCormick food coloring site gives nice directions on how to make this. 1 cup warm water, 1tsp vinegar, about 20 drops of food coloring.

I used the Neon food colorings for this, mostly because that’s what I have in my cupboard. I always tend to like bright colors if I’m going to the effort to use food dye. My purple mixture looked straight up black, but the eggs came out looking nice.

Left the eggs to dry.
Left the eggs to dry.

I tossed my eggs back in the carton to dry, as I didn’t care too much if I ended up with spots on the shells where they touched. Loving the colors that the eggs ended up.

The outcome.
The outcome.

Interestingly, the blue dyed eggs ended up with a lot of color…. the purple ones definitely didn’t. And my old eggs may have been a bit older than would be preferred as they didn’t end up very round. Good thing these were just for me anyways.

Yolks were all over the place in these eggs.
Yolks were all over the place in these eggs.

To top up the odd shaped eggs, my yolks were all over the place. You can see that small dark ring around the yolk I was talking about earlier. That’s from my distracted boiling and not knowing how long they boiled. Perhaps that’s the one time I should have been paying more attention.

I slice my eggs using a sharp knife, making sure to wipe the knife between each egg because there is always a bit of yolk stuck and I don’t want that all over the next egg I’m cutting.

Filling makings.
Filling makings.

Popped all the yolks out. I just give them a gentle push from the outside and they usually come out easily. If there’s a little still attached it doesn’t really matter because they get filled right up anyways.

For my filling with 9 eggs, I used about 1/4 cup mayo, 2 tablespoons dijon (I like the mustard flavor, lots of people would probably rather have less than this), about 1/4 salt and pepper. Give it all a good mix until it’s smooth. Super simple.

The best bag filing method.
The best bag filing method.

I use a pint glass with a sandwich zip top bag as my filling method. It’s super easy to fill the bag when you shove it in a cup and turn the top over the edge of the cup!

It works so well!
It works so well!
Clip the corner, no fancy bag needed.
Clip the corner, no fancy bag needed.

To get the piping bag thing going, just smooth the air out of the top of the bag and seal, then clip the corner. Presto, piping bag!

The final eggs.
The final eggs.

Not claiming I have the best piping skills ever, but that goes well with my odd looking eggs.

I probably won’t go to the trouble to dye eggs to make deviled eggs again, unless I come up with some better dying method as these don’t even show up that well. But it was a fun experiment!